gailsimone:

kellyjacobsbooks:

rosalarian:

gailsimone:


the preeminent gail simone of our time

One’s too many and a hundred ain’t enough.

100% truth

never heard of her.
If feminists wish to be accepted in the comic industry, or any industry, then make something of genuine worth and individuality, instead of a statement about gender inequality by just flipping organs between parties.
Why is Ellen/ Robin Williams popular as a comedian? Because s/he’s good at it. Why are Dane Cook/Sarah Silverman  on the fringes of an industry? Because they fucking suck ass.
Gender does not matter. Stand on creative merit!

Yikes.

gailsimone:

kellyjacobsbooks:

rosalarian:

gailsimone:

the preeminent gail simone of our time

One’s too many and a hundred ain’t enough.

100% truth

never heard of her.

If feminists wish to be accepted in the comic industry, or any industry, then make something of genuine worth and individuality, instead of a statement about gender inequality by just flipping organs between parties.

Why is Ellen/ Robin Williams popular as a comedian? Because s/he’s good at it. Why are Dane Cook/Sarah Silverman  on the fringes of an industry? Because they fucking suck ass.

Gender does not matter. Stand on creative merit!

Yikes.

(Source: dee-lirious)

neyruto:

can we stop being so heteronormative here on tumblr.com. some guys aren’t looking for their m’lady, some guys are out there looking for their m’lord. 

(via kingcheddarxvii)

oliviersilven:

GODZILLA

The world ends, Godzilla begins.
Croquis+Photoshop. All Artwork Copyright Olivier SILVEN.

oliviersilven:

GODZILLA

The world ends, Godzilla begins.

Croquis+Photoshop.
 
All Artwork Copyright Olivier SILVEN.

(via kittycatkissu)

There are no such things as “opposite” genders, any more than a strawberry is the “opposite” as a plum.

Hanne Blank, Straight: The Surprisingly Short History of Heterosexuality (via pinkprisoner)

(Source: transschmuck, via adriofthedead)

dottewa:

a-void-reality:

GO WATCH THIS SHOW, HONESTLY IT IS SO AMAZING. 

IF THIS POST CREATES 1 NEW PUSHING DAISIES FAN MY LIFE = MADE. 

Alright let me help out then:

1) Most of the cast is female. In fact only two main characters are male.

2) Both male characters take typically non-masculine hobbies. Emerson Cod knits almost non-stop and makes pop-up books. Ned is literally called “The Pie-Maker” because he bakes homestyle pies from his mother’s method. Both are shown to be very nurturing and even maternal characters. Conversely, the women? A pair of professional travelling show performers that have gritty sexual scandals the way men usually get (see the entire “Chuck’s father” storylines), a beekeeper who is the single most positive and optimistic character imaginable, and a former professional jockey- Three of four pro athletes.

3) You could very easily make the claim Ned is asexual.

4) Yes, the storyline is about romance. But it’s also about the positive side of a love story, and their only drama lies in overcoming their inability to actually share contact.

5) A very good friend of mine recommended this show to me as “Disney for adults.” I told her it was already on my list to watch because “It’s by Bryan Fuller, from Wonderfalls and Dead Like Me.” Bryan Fuller is now most known for “Hannibal.” The same camera methods and bright colours and lighting techniques Hannibal is known for? Perfected in this show, just using a different tone- The same colour methods in reverse, upping the vivid greens and yellows instead of reds and blues, which sells emotion both ways.

7) Probably one of the best examples of a modern day fairy tale possible.

8) Narrated by Jim Dale- The narrator for the HP audio books.

(via adriofthedead)

reginechassagnarly:

sign this right now
the goal of the non-binary petition is flawed, this one is much more realistic and has a serious concrete goal that will help people definitely more than harm them (which the nb petition has the possibility of doing) 

reginechassagnarly:

sign this right now

the goal of the non-binary petition is flawed, this one is much more realistic and has a serious concrete goal that will help people definitely more than harm them (which the nb petition has the possibility of doing) 

(via adriofthedead)

wired:

theatlantic:

The Quiet Radicalism of All That

The ’90s were golden years for Nickelodeon. The children’s cable television network was home to now cult-classic shows like Are You Afraid of the Dark? (1991-2000), Clarissa Explains It All (1991-’94), The Secret Life of Alex Mack (1994-’98), and Salute Your Shorts (1991-’92)—arguably heretofore unmatched in their clever, un-condescending approach to entertaining young people. Nick News with Linda Ellerbee launched in 1992, and remains to this day one of the only shows on-air devoted to frank, engaging discussions of teen issues and opinions.
But perhaps the program that best embodied the values of Nick in those years was All That, a sketch-comedy show that premiered 20 years ago today. Created by Brian Robbins and Mike Tollin, All That ran for an impressive 10 seasons before it was canceled in 2005. The prolific franchise spawned a number of spin-offs (Good Burger, Kenan & Kel, The Amanda Show) and launched the careers of several comedy mainstays: Kenan Thompson, Amanda Bynes, Nick Cannon, and Taran Killam.
Like Saturday Night Live (which would later hire Thompson and Killam), All That was a communal pop-cultural touchstone. The parents of ’90s kids had the Church Lady, “more cowbell,” and Roseanne Roseannadanna; the kids themselves, though, had Pierre Escargot, “Vital Information,” and Repairman Man Man Man, and we recited their catch-phrases to one another in the cafeteria and on the playground. Although All That was clearly designed as a SNL, Jr., of sorts, it wasn’t merely starter sketch comedy—it was an admittedly daring venture for a children’s network to embark on.
In its own right, All That was a weirdly subversive little show. It never explicitly crossed the line into “mature” territory, but it constantly flirted with the limits of FCC-approved family-friendliness. Take, for instance, the “Ask Ashley” sketch. A barely tween-aged Amanda Bynes (Seasons Three to Six), played an adorably wide-eyed video advice-columnist. Ashley (“That’s me!”) would read painfully dimwitted letters from fans with clearly solvable problems. (Example: “Dear Ashley, I live in a two-story house and my room is upstairs. Every morning, when it’s time to go to school, I jump out the window. So far I’ve broken my leg 17 times. Do you have any helpful suggestions for me?”) She would wait a beat, smile sweetly into the camera, then fly into a manic rage; emitting a stream of G-rated curses, always tantalizingly on the verge of spitting a true obscenity into the mix.
Read more. [Image: Nickelodeon]


They don’t make kid’s shows like they used to — not only in regards to actual content, but also in reference to the diversity of the casting. 
Those were the days.

wired:

theatlantic:

The Quiet Radicalism of All That

The ’90s were golden years for Nickelodeon. The children’s cable television network was home to now cult-classic shows like Are You Afraid of the Dark? (1991-2000), Clarissa Explains It All (1991-’94), The Secret Life of Alex Mack (1994-’98), and Salute Your Shorts (1991-’92)—arguably heretofore unmatched in their clever, un-condescending approach to entertaining young people. Nick News with Linda Ellerbee launched in 1992, and remains to this day one of the only shows on-air devoted to frank, engaging discussions of teen issues and opinions.

But perhaps the program that best embodied the values of Nick in those years was All That, a sketch-comedy show that premiered 20 years ago today. Created by Brian Robbins and Mike Tollin, All That ran for an impressive 10 seasons before it was canceled in 2005. The prolific franchise spawned a number of spin-offs (Good Burger, Kenan & Kel, The Amanda Show) and launched the careers of several comedy mainstays: Kenan Thompson, Amanda Bynes, Nick Cannon, and Taran Killam.

Like Saturday Night Live (which would later hire Thompson and Killam), All That was a communal pop-cultural touchstone. The parents of ’90s kids had the Church Lady, “more cowbell,” and Roseanne Roseannadanna; the kids themselves, though, had Pierre Escargot, “Vital Information,” and Repairman Man Man Man, and we recited their catch-phrases to one another in the cafeteria and on the playground. Although All That was clearly designed as a SNL, Jr., of sorts, it wasn’t merely starter sketch comedy—it was an admittedly daring venture for a children’s network to embark on.

In its own right, All That was a weirdly subversive little show. It never explicitly crossed the line into “mature” territory, but it constantly flirted with the limits of FCC-approved family-friendliness. Take, for instance, the “Ask Ashley” sketch. A barely tween-aged Amanda Bynes (Seasons Three to Six), played an adorably wide-eyed video advice-columnist. Ashley (“That’s me!”) would read painfully dimwitted letters from fans with clearly solvable problems. (Example: “Dear Ashley, I live in a two-story house and my room is upstairs. Every morning, when it’s time to go to school, I jump out the window. So far I’ve broken my leg 17 times. Do you have any helpful suggestions for me?”) She would wait a beat, smile sweetly into the camera, then fly into a manic rage; emitting a stream of G-rated curses, always tantalizingly on the verge of spitting a true obscenity into the mix.

Read more. [Image: Nickelodeon]

They don’t make kid’s shows like they used to — not only in regards to actual content, but also in reference to the diversity of the casting.

Those were the days.

(via tentakrule)

Do me a favor.

everythingsbetterwithbisexuals:

Reblog this if a medical professional has ever treated you like shit or fucked up your diagnosis or was just generally wrong.

(via ittygittydiddynator)

tpoyle1996:

“I mean I’ll probably wreck it, I dunno.”

tpoyle1996:

“I mean I’ll probably wreck it, I dunno.”

(via adriofthedead)